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  • The Prodigal Son
  • The Prodigal Son
  • The Prodigal Son
  • The Prodigal Son
  • The Prodigal Son

The Prodigal Son

Inspired by the following passage from the Bible: “Then He (Jesus) said, ‘There was once a man who had two sons. The younger said to his father, “Father, I want right now what’s coming to me.” So the father divided the property between them. It wasn’t long before the younger son packed his bags and left for a distant country. There, undisciplined and dissipated, he wasted everything he had. After he had gone through all his money, there was a bad famine all through that country and he began to hurt. That brought him to his senses. He said, “All those farmhands working for my father sit down to three meals a day, and here I a starving to death. I’m going back to my father.” He got right up and went home to his father. When he was still a long way off, his father saw him. His heart pounding, he ran out, embraced him, and kissed him. The son started his speech: “Father, I’ve sinned against God, I’ve sinned before you; I don’t deserve to be called your son ever again. Take me on as a hired hand.” But the father wasn’t listening. He was calling to the servants, “Quick. Bring a clean set of clothes and dress him. Put the family ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. My son is here—given up for dead and now alive! Given up for lost and now found!” And they began to have a wonderful time.’ ” Luke 15:11-14, 17, 18, 19b, 20-22, 24 (The Message)

size: 30% larger than life

This parable or story of the lost son as recorded by Luke is Jesus’ longest and most detailed of all. Delesprie was commissioned by The Crystal Cathedral to sculpt this heroic sized monument (32% larger than life) inspired by the message of a father’s unconditional love and forgiveness toward his wayward son. The piece, entitled “Coming Home,” can be viewed on the grounds of the Crystal Cathedral, and captures the moment when the penitent son throws himself at his father’s feet.

Notice the son’s tattered robe, his bare, calloused feet, and the many cuts and abrasions on his body. This young man has learned many difficult life lessons since leaving his father and the comforts of home. Now, totally bereft of all he once held dear, his only hope rests with his father. Is it possible his father could take him back as one of his servants? Yes, perhaps, but would he?

Tears of sorrow and repentance flow freely down the son’s face, too long held back from pride. Grasping his father by the neck, he makes his plea and immediately falls to his knees.

As ones eyes lift upward from the desolate figure, a stark contrast of emotion is portrayed on the face of the father. He, too, is weeping, but upon closer scrutiny, it is evident his tears fall out of joy. The father’s gaze is toward Heaven, and it’s easy to imagine him repeatedly mouthing the words, “Thank you, thank you!” Another distinguishing feature of the father is his clothing. His elaborate, ornamented robe and cloak, fastened at the neck with a silken cord, is no different than what his son once wore. By his command, the lost son will be so arrayed by days end.

An interesting detail, on which Delesprie intentionally focused her attention, is the stance of the father as he embraces his son. Observe his bent knees and muscular arms as he almost stoops to raise his beloved son back up to eye level. In the father’s mind, this is not a time to berate his willful child for squandering his inheritance. Here, as in Jesus’ parable, the father, a representation of our own Heavenly Father, is most concerned about restored relationships. After all, his son was lost, and is now found; was dead, and is now alive! –By Allison Garner

  2012  /  Religious  /  Last Updated August 14, 2012 by delesprie-admin  /